Posted by: Bay Presbyterian Church | July 3, 2013

Independence Day Facts

The Declaration of Independence

 

Declaration of Independence

Did You Know…

The legal separation of the Thirteen Colonies from Great Britain actually occurred on July 2, 1776

So why is Independence Day celebrated on July 4th?  From the outset, Americans celebrated independence on July 4th, because it was the date shown on the much-publicized Declaration of Independence rather than on July 2nd, which was the date the resolution of independence was approved in a closed session of Congress.

Another bit of interesting trivia is the fact that most historians think that the Declaration was actually signed on August 2nd, 1776, nearly a month after its adoption and not on July 4th, as is commonly believed.

On July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was approved by the Continental Congress. Initially signed by John Hancock, it took about a month to get all 56 delegates together to sign the document.

Back in 1776, there were approximately 2.5 million people living in our newly independent nation. Flash forward to 2013, and our nation’s estimated population on the 4th of July will be 316.2 million.

Finally, did you know that John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, both of whom had not only signed the Declaration of Independence but went on to serve as Presidents of the United States, died on July 4th, 1826. Another Founding Father who became President, James Monroe, died on July 4, 1831 becoming the third President in a row to die on Independence Day.   (source: Wikipedia)

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